Things to do

 

Leisure activities can be relaxing or stimulating depending on what you choose to do. Take a look at the wide variety of sports, social clubs, arts and games and lots of accessible places to visit, which are there to enjoy in Surrey.

Visit Britain – Guide to Britain for disabled visitors.

Rough Guide to Accessible Britain – Read over 180 reviews of accessible and inspiring days out.

Accessible Countryside for everyone – promotes accessibility to leisure and sport.

Disabled Go – Search for information on over 90,000 venues across the UK and Ireland.

Travel guide for older people - Silver Travel Advisors have a free magazine and selection of mini-guides, all aimed at providing you with the best travel information, whether you are planning a round-the-world voyage or a fun day out closer to home, with gardens, museums, activities for grandchildren and accessible venues available.

The National Trust - offer access information for each of their parks in Surrey and nationwide on the website. They also offer an Essential Companion Card that makes it simple to bring one or two carers or companions with you, free of charge. Just show the card when you arrive, and your carer(s) or companion(s) won’t need to pay an entry fee.

Get a CEA card - Enables a disabled cinema guest to receive a complimentary ticket for someone to go with them when they visit a participating cinema.

Official London Theatre - Many theatres have concession tickets for disabled people, and some offer a free ticket for accompanying carers.

National rail enquiries – information for disabled customers –Quick guide of what you can expect from all train companies as a customer with a disability.

 

Fitness for older adults (65 years and over)

Be active around the house – cooking, housework and walking while you're on the phone can help keep you mobile, although these activities won't count towards your weekly activity target.  Heavy gardening – including pushing, bending, squatting, carrying, digging and shovelling – can also provide a good workout.

NHS Live-Well has lots of advice, tips and exercises for staying active and healthy, including jet into shape with strength and flex, joining a walking group, trying swimming, yoga, tai chi or pilates. There is also a running plan to take you from couch to 5k running.

Conservation groups are a way to get involved in improving your local environment and being active at the same time. Find out more about Green Gyms.

Try something new. If you're not sure what activities you'd like, find out which sport or activity you're best suited to using the BBC's 'Which sport are you made for?' tool.

Senior sports or fitness classes keep you motivated and can be fun, relieve stress and help you meet friends.

 

Disabled people

When it comes to exercise, disabled people have pretty much the same options – everything from simply getting out a bit more to playing team sports.

If you can walk, there's no easier way to increase your activity levels. Try to include walking in your daily routine. Find a friend to walk with or join a walking group for some extra motivation.

NHS Live-Well has lots of advice, tips and exercises for staying active and healthy, including get into shape with strength and flex, joining a walking group, trying swimming, yoga, tai chi or pilates. There is also a running plan to take you from couch to 5k running.

Cycling – there are tricycles, quadcycles, recumbants, hand-powered bikes called handcycles, and power-assisted bicycles, all of which are alternatives for those unable to ride a regular bicycle. Find out more at British Cycling, the Handcycling Association, Companion Cycling and Race Running.

Choose a gym from more than 400 Inclusive Fitness Initiative (IFI) accredited gyms. Find your nearest IFI facility by going to the English Federation of Disability Sport website.

Swimming can feel quite liberating if you have a physical disability, as your body is mostly supported by the water. Many pools offer classes and sessions that cater specifically for disabled people. Find out more at swimming.org.

Adapted sports – many sports can be played by disabled people on the same basis as non-disabled people. Some, such as blind football, have also been adapted to make them more disability-friendly.

 

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